Keynote speakers

Programme

 

Our draft programme is now available to download. Please note this is subject to change. You can download the conference handbook here.

Friday 30 November 2018

08:30-09:30  Registration, tea, coffee, pastries
09:30-09:45 Welcome and scene setting: Joyce Martin, Director, JCS Online Resources
 09:45-10:30   Opening keynote: Developing digital and information literacies: teaching for lifelong learning

Dr Jane Secker, Senior Lecturer in Educational Development – City, University of London

10:35-11:10 Lightning Talks

Importance of research and referencing skills using online databases 

Lynn Winkworth, MCLIP, Head Librarian, Headington School, Oxford

The Library and the EPQ: enabling students to become 'digitally savvy' in a real-world context

Emma Wallace, Senior School Librarian and Dr Julie Greenhough, EPQ Centre Coordinator, St Benedict’s School, London

Exploring the information seeking behaviour of secondary school students

Gaelene Clarke, Librarian, Dubai College

Developing an online offer for pre-University entry information and digital literacy 

Amy C Haworth, Service Development Manager, University of Sheffield Library

Listen –Collaborate –Observe – Repeat: how to implement a safe BYOD culture

Océane Toffoli, Senior School Librarian, Wimbledon High School and Vice-Chair CILIP YLG London

The library in the digital world 

Chris Thackray, Director of IT and eLearning and Linda Kelley, Librarian, St Paul’s Girls’ School

11:15-11:45 Break and chat
11:45-12:20 Creating a culture of critical literacy: three essential mindsets for school librarians

Dr Graham Gardner, Librarian, Abingdon School

12:20-12:55
Keynote: “Can’t you just give us 2 sides of A4?” Stepping up library use from school to higher education

Hazel Rothera, Academic Development Team Leader, Oxford Brookes University

13:00-13:35 Lightning Talks

Embedding digital literacy skills in Year 9

Donna Saxby, Librarian and Digital Literacy Coordinator, Kingham Hill School, Oxon

How effective are our students' digital searching skills? 

Rhian Trevor, City of London School for Girls

Collaboration with teachers and specialist libraries

Terri McCargar, Librarian and Ruth Bell, Head of History of Art, Latymer Upper School, London

Tackling plagiarism in the digital world

Abha Singh, Secondary School Librarian/Extended Essay Coordinator, British School, New Delhi

Developing independent learning skills from Year 9-13 through project-based learning and librarian-led support

Lucy Atherton, MCILIP, Head Librarian, Wellington College, Berkshire

Preparing students to become independent learners and digitally literate: the story of successful collaboration between EPQ coordinator and librarian

Margot Griffiths, EPQ Coordinator and Helen Cooper, Librarian, King Henry VIII School, Coventry

13:35-14:45 Lunch and chat
14:45-15:30 Workshops

Using images in teaching – what you need to know about copyright

Dr Jane Secker, Senior Lecturer in Educational Development - City, University of London and Chris Morrison, Copyright and Licensing Compliance Officer, University of Kent

Innovative ways to increase student engagement

John Lenahan, Associate Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, JSTOR

How to spark creativity, imagination, and autonomous, student-driven research in the classroom and beyond

Karen Harker, PhD student, University of Birmingham’s Shakespeare Institute and Student Ambassador for Gale Cengage 

Digital literacy in practice – lifelong learning skills

Sarah Pavey MSc FCLIP, Independent Consultant & Trainer

Developing your research project: preparing students to succeed at a Russell Group university

Dr Emma Thompson, Learn with US Transition Leader, University of Southampton

How librarians can use online resources to enhance information literacy skills, collaborate with teachers and win time in the classroom

Elizabeth Hutchinson Head of Schools’ Library Service, Guernsey

15:35-16:30 Keynote: What can we learn from our neighbours? School Librarian collaboration – an Australian perspective 

Nikki Curtis, Director of Marketing, Softlink

16:30-17:00 Closing plenary: What have you learned today? What might you now do differently?
17:30-18:30 Wine reception
19:00 Dinner and quiz

 

Saturday 1 December 2018

09:30-11:00   JSTOR eBook Workshop

John Lenahan, Associate Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, JSTOR                             

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Abstract

Developing digital and information literacies: teaching for lifelong learning

Dr Jane Secker, Senior Lecturer in Educational Development City, University of London

In this keynote, Jane will discuss the terms digital literacy and information literacy and the way in which these skills, values and behaviours underpin lifelong learning. She will talk about the need to embed digital and information literacies in curriculum within schools and their importance for success at higher education, in the workplace and as life skills that we all need. She will draw on her experiences working with academic staff as a Senior Lecturer in Educational Development at City University, and her previous experience as the Copyright and Digital Literacy advisor at the London School of Economics, where she worked for 15 years, supporting staff and students.

 

Abstract

“Can’t you just give us 2 sides of A4?” Stepping up library use from school to higher education

Hazel Rothera, Academic Development Team Leader, Oxford Brookes University

Students on arrival at University find that moving into higher education gives them access to more library resources, both in print and digitally, than they ever imagined existed. Many initially find this overwhelming, both in quantity and in the level of the texts they are suddenly expected to digest and understand. In recent years both academics and librarians in universities have experienced increasing pushback from students at the idea that they should search for resources themselves, do their own critical evaluation or that they are “expected to read a whole book”. How does this link to those students’ experiences in schools, and what does it mean for school librarians?

Abstract 

Creating a culture of critical literacy: three essential mindsets for school librarians

Dr Graham Gardner, Librarian, Abingdon School

In the light of calls for digital and information literacies to be embedded in school curricular, Graham Gardner will outline how school librarians can play a leading role in creating a culture of critical information literacy. School librarians, Graham will argue, need to reframe and redirect their thinking and practice in terms of three key mindsets: those of teacher, marketer and technologist. The more that school librarians can identify with these mindsets and develop their practice accordingly, the more likely it is that subject teachers will be receptive to offers of resources and collaboration, that students will take librarians seriously, and that potential barriers to teaching and learning will be minimised. Graham will suggest how school librarians can go about this process, emphasizing the importance of self-directed CPD along with the likely challenges librarians will face. He will illustrate his arguments with examples of success and failure from his own nine-year career at schools in both the state and independent sectors. 

 

Abstract

School librarian collaboration – an Australian perspective

Nikki Curtis, Director of Marketing, Softlink

Greater collaboration between school libraries and educators is a prominent topic for school library professionals. The Softlink 2017 School Library Survey’s asked the question ‘How do you currently collaborate, or what ideas do you have for greater collaboration between the library and the rest of the school?’. The combined global survey’s received almost 1,500 responses and a whitepaper – Ideas for school-wide collaboration was developed from responses.

This presentation explores the positive impact school-wide collaboration has on student research and learning outcomes, including innovative examples by means of video interviews with Australian librarians.

Networking opportunities

Refreshments

Throughout the day delegates will have access to unlimited tea, coffee and cold drinks, as well as a three course hot/cold buffet lunch. There will be also be a morning and mid-afternoon break, when guests will be treated to 'grazing stations' offering various treats such as pastries, fruit, tray bakes, sweets and more!

*Please mention any dietary requirements on the registration form.

Exhibition

There will be a number of publishers and organisations linked to the conference theme available to talk to during the refreshment breaks. Many may also join the conference sessions to learn about the challenges and opportunities delegates are facing in school.

Wine reception

After the conference JCS would like to invite all delegates to a wine reception in Conference Aston Hotel's bar, a good opportunity to wind down from the day and get to know fellow professionals.

Dinner

Following the wine reception, a relaxing dinner and quiz in the Conference Hotel’s dining room is also available for delegates to book through JCS.

After dinner, why not stay over and explore Birmingham the next day? Discover more about Birmingham's attractions and accommodation.

 

Sponsors 

 

Venue

Discover everything you need to know about this year's venue, Conference Aston, Aston University.

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